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MOBILE BANKING SERVICES ADOPTION: AN EXPLORATORY STUDY

Himani Dahiya and Hamendra Kumar Dangi

Volume 38, Issue 2 (October 2017 to March 2018)

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Over the last two decades, there has been a rapid advancement in telecommunication infrastructure, particularly in the field of wireless technology. This has facilitated an immense growth in Mobile commerce (m-commerce), thereby making it an increasingly important part of our daily lives. Moreover, there has been recent evolution in mobile technologies like 3G, 4G and massive upspring in the use of mobile devices (especially smartphones). With this, m-commerce have provided various significant opportunities for telecom companies and mobile service providers to create and offer new value added services such as mobile wallets to their customers. The purpose of this paper is to examine the overall status and the increasing relevance of mobile banking or payment services in India. Further, the objective of this study is to analyze and gain a meaningful insight into the various key drivers and inhibitors that has an impact on consumer’s value perception and thus influences their behavioural intention to adopt and use an innovative technology which is wireless or Mobile banking (m-banking) in this context. For this we have conducted an extensive review of extant literature in context of m-banking adoption with respect to various developed and developing countries by using ‘NVivo 11 Plus’. The findings highlighted that the most commonly applied model by majority of the studies for understanding m-banking adoption is technology acceptance model and its various extensions. Furthermore, it was revealed that the most significant facets or attributes of adoption are compatibility, perceived usefulness, perceived risk, perceived trust and attitude in both developing and developed countries.

DAY TO DAY ECONOMICS

Anju Verma

Volume 39, Issue 2 (July 2018 to December 2018)

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Economics and its applications are considered as an arcane, prosaic and an elusive science. It involves more sophisms than any other field of study known to man. It is not just about the numbers, it is also about commerce, business, politics, psychology, history, and so much more. Taylor (2012). Economists over the years have found it very difficult to explain the basic economic principles and how and why they affect a layman. Tirole (2017) says Economics is a lens that shapes how we look at the world. Understanding it does not require expert knowledge, Intellectual curiosity is just enough to break into the world of economics. Satish Y. Deodhar has also attempted to demystify the world of economics by writing this book.

Agricultural Growth and Stagnation in Bihar: History and Prospects

Rakesh Ranjan

Volume 41, Issue 2 (July 2020 to December 2020)

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The state of Bihar in India draws academic attention mostly for its backwardness. Given that there is very poor industrial base in the state, the majority of its inhabitants still are dependent of agricultural activities for their livelihood. In the near foreseeable future, in absence of any significant change in its economic structure, the growth dynamics of agricultural sector will keep influencing the overall growth of the state. Given this importance, the present paper attempts to understand the nature and character of agricultural growth in the state in the last six decades. This is done to identify some crucial patterns that may guide any possible intervention to ameliorate the agrarian stagnation. Change in cropping pattern, expanding reliable irrigation, and focus on rice yields appear to be holding key to future progress.

Ethical Conduct of Educated Youth in India- A study of MBA students

Mala Sinha and Anisha

Volume 40, Issue 1 (January 2019 to June 2019)

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The purpose of this study is to understand the nature and categories of (un)ethical behaviours that are displayed by educated youth in India. The rationale for the study is based on the fact that there is an increase in corporate crimes in the current area of globalisation. Since research studies have shown that a large number of global organisations hire managerial resource from business schools this study has examined the unethical and transgressive practices of, post-graduate students pursuing MBA- the resource pool for business organisations. Data was collected from 65 respondents doing master’s in business administration from one of the leading institutions of the country. The age of the participants was between 21-27 years, most of them were freshers but a few had work experience. Based on narratives of the (un)ethical conducts of their peer group described, content analysis was conducted to understand the transgressive behaviours of educated business school youth. The results showed that most of the stated conducts by the participants were unethical and very few were ethical. Three identified categories of major unethical conducts were: academic misconducts, rule breaking and lying. Under these categories various unethical themes were also identified. In all 54 kinds of unethical behaviours and themes were identified under 9 domains like classroom, public life and inter-personal relations. During the debriefing interviews it was found that the reported unethical conducts were linked to imitating behaviour of role models, goal-orientation due to competitiveness and learned cultural behaviours.

Competitive Behaviour of Outward Foreign Direct Investment from India

Manoj Kumar Sinha and Shalini Rawal

Volume 41, Issue 1 (January 2020 to June 2020)

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The paper intends to focus on the direction of Outward Foreign Direct Investment (OFDI) from India. It also analyses the competition for Indian overseas investment among different country groupings. In terms of direction of OFDI from India, the changes in ranks of FDI outflows to developing countries are more than that of developed countries. Ranking patterns reveals that there is high level of competition among developing countries to attract Indian overseas investors. Somewhat same results are depicted by Index of Rank Dominance (IRD) in case of all the countries of the world, where out of total 25 countries, 7 are developed countries and other are developing countries, majority of them are considered to be tax havens. Mobility and Turnover shows high competition for OFDI from India in developing countries than developed countries.

THE IDEA OF UNIVERSAL BASIC INCOME IN INDIA: AN ANALYSIS

Virender Kumar and Shivani Kanojia

Volume 38, Issue 2 (October 2017 to March 2018)

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The idea of universal basic income (UBI) has been assuming great importance in today’s world because the existing welfare schemes have failed in addressing the problem of poverty effectively. The existing schemes are generally mired in red-tapism, data manipulation, exclusion error, corruption, high leakages and high administrative and implementation costs. The system of UBI overcomes above issues through (i) its feature of being un-conditional and universal, and (ii) through transfer of a guaranteed income directly to the beneficiaries. In this context, the paper concludes that UBI can be a good alternative to all the existing welfare schemes to reduce poverty in India. However, the introduction of UBI currently faces many practical difficulties and hence it should be implemented only in a gradual manner.

Sovereign Wealth Funds: A Critical Analysis

Roshni Garg and Abha Shukla

Volume 41, Issue 2 (July 2020 to December 2020)

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Sovereign wealth funds (SWFs) refer to government owned investment vehicles that mostly invest abroad to meet some pre-determined macroeconomic objectives. Over the past few years, the number of SWFs and their assets have multiplied. In India too, SWFs have taken several big stakes during the Covid-19 pandemic and become the fourth largest category of foreign portfolio investors (FPIs) among thirty-two categories of FPIs investing in India. They have also expanded their footprint into debt and real estate markets. Despite this, not much is known about their investment activities, primarily owing to lack of data. By analysing multiple resources and databases, this paper seeks to give an overview of SWFs, their evolution, investment activities and associated challenges. We find that commodity exporting nations have been the pioneer of these funds and almost all SWFs have a strong preference for investing in real estate and finance, especially in high-income developed countries. We also discuss the characteristics of Indian SWF, NIIF and how it is different from conventional SWFs. Our paper concludes with a brief discussion on the presence of foreign SWFs in India and the need to further explore the issue in detail.

Lessons from the Unprecedented Pandemic: An Economist's Perspective

Ritu Ranjan

Volume 42, Issue 1 (January 2021 to June 2021)

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The global economy is passing through the worst economic crisis of modern times since the beginning of 2020 due to the outbreak of an unprecedented pandemic resulting from the spread of novel Corona or Covid-19 virus. The abruptness with which this pandemic erupted and the fast pace at which its disruptive and disastrous impact spread across more than 220 countries of the world makes it a serious area of concern. The emerging challenges are even more daunting in the case of Indian economy owing to the huge population base, high population density and grossly deficient health infrastructure in India. It is against this backdrop that the present paper goes deeper into the important lessons that can be learnt from the unprecedented pandemic and analyses them from the perspective of an economist. In particular, the significance of contingency planning, building-up of reserve capacity, overcoming institutional rigidities and infrastructural bottlenecks, gradualism and cautious optimism are brought to the fore. Besides, issues relating to the demandside as well as supply-side management of an economy as also resource mobilisation for effectively tackling the pandemic are also discussed. The whole discussion provides useful insights for public policy-making that can be reasonably expected to go a long way in improving the policy environment in the times to come.

GANDHI: AN IMPOSSIBLE POSSIBILITY

Sudhir Chandra

Volume 38, Issue 2 (October 2017 to March 2018)

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Gandhi: An impossible possibility elucidates on the last days of Gandhi’s journey into the mortal world and the struggles that he encountered during these days. It explicates on Gandhi’s philosophical inclinations and how that inspired him in shaping the India of his dreams and underwent a gradual change when his end was approaching. It seeks to understand the dilemmas that Gandhi was caught in during his last days, his sorrows, both at a personal level and national level which brought a marked change in his state of mind and his desire to not live any longer.

Does Corporate Social Responsibility affect Corporate Financial Performance? A Myth or a Reality

Lovleen Gupta, Varda Sardana, Garima Narula & Shubham Singhania

Volume 42, Issue 1 (January 2021 to June 2021)

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Corporations are being encouraged to commence social responsibility reporting in their financial statements and indulge in various activities due to the ascending shareholders’ interest in social performance. Many companies are, therefore, implementing social responsibility as a part of their daily operations. The aim of this study is to examine the impact of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) on the Corporate Financial Performance (CFP) of companies in the Indian context. Moreover, stakeholder theory and reputation theory have been analysed to understand the causal connection between CSR and CFP. NIFTY 50, a measure of the Indian market index that represents India's 50 largest companies listed on the National Stock Exchange, has been used as the study's base. Panel data regression with fixed effect assumptions has been employed for 210 firm-year observations from 2014-15 to 2018-19. The findings indicate that Corporate Social Responsibility and Corporate Financial Performance in terms of accounting and market-based measurements (Tobin’s Q and ROA) have a significant and positive relationship. Although multiple studies have been undertaken to understand the relationship between CSR and CFP, this study goes one step further by focussing on the mandatory provisions of CSR as per the Companies Act 2013, and its impact on financial performance post these mandatory provisions.